Buck Institute Project Checklist

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Design
Principle
Evidence
Begin
with
the
End
in
Mind
ð Content outcomes aligned with national, state, or district standards.
ð Requires students to develop, apply, and demonstrate literacy or numeracy skills.
ð Organized around an open ended driving question or problem that inspires higher
order thinking, encourages focused problem-solving skills, and requires core
knowledge to answer.
ð Requires students to construct knowledge.
ð Requires students to engage in targeted inquiry, including using prior knowledge,
gaining in-depth understanding of subject, and mastering core conventions of the
discipline/field.
ð Addresses issues, problems, or questions faced by people in the world outside of
school.
ð Requires students to develop 1-3 21st Century skills.
ð Encourages students to reflect on and develop personal strengths.
ð Incorporates activities and tasks that encourage student autonomy.
ð Encourages and honors student ‘voice and choice’.
ð Students have contact withadults outside the classroom.
ð Student work reviewed by a “real” audience.
ð Students do extensive exploration and research, including field-based activities.
ð Involves students and teachers in a wide range of communication,patterns, roles, and
activities.
ð Is of sufficient duration for students to engage in a complex, problem-
focused process of assimilating facts, using skills, contemplating
solutions,and creating worthwhile products.
ð Involves presentation of student work to an audience beyond the teacher
classroom.
Craft
the
Driving
Question
ð The driving question or problem has meaning and relevance to studentsand may be generated
by them.
ð The driving question is neither too open-ended nor too concrete.
ð The driving question is appropriate to the content outcomes for the project.
ð The driving question serves as a guide to the direction of inquiry and products for the project.
Plan
A
s
s
e
s
s
m
e
n
t
s
ð Assessments are closely aligned to standards and are rich and variedenough to make
credible judgments about learning.
ð Products and performances are varied and sufficient to provide theopportunity for students to
be adequately assessed on all outcomes, including performance assessments for skills, and
self-report or similar assessments for personal strengths.
ð The project includes a culminating exhibition, presentation, or product inwhich students
demonstrate that they can apply their knowledge.
ð Artifacts or other assessments are included as ways to measure the“process"of the project.
ð Formative assessments are included.
ð Students are informed of all assessments at the beginning of the project.
ð Students will be given regular feedback on performance as the projectprogresses.
Map
the
Project
ð Appropriate scaffold activities have been built into the project time-line.
ð Project includes an appropriate, engaging introduction or launch activity.
ð Students will use technology as a tool for learning.
ð Students will use a variety of time and task management tools during theproject.
ð Students have opportunities to develop workplace competencies.
ð Appropriate time-line is established.
ð Project plans for differentiated instruction; students of varying skill levelscan approach the
project appropriately.
Manage
the
Process
ð Driving question is discussed and posted.
ð Solutions to the problem or approaches to the question are discussed atthe beginning of the
project.
ð Assessments and criteria for performance are clearly explained to studentsat beginning of
project.
ð Project materials are organized and available to students.
ð Students receive timely feedback on their work in progress.
ð Students understand what is required of them and are given exemplars ofwork.
ð Reflection is built into the project plan.
ð Students are taught to self-assess and are required to use structuredmethods to review
progress.